The First Sunday in September

Video of Interview for Croke Park GAA Museum Now Live

The video of my interview with Julianne McKeigue of the Croke Park GAA Museum, marking the selection of The First Sunday in September as the Museum Book Club Book of the Month in their book club. I really enjoyed the chat with Julianne. You can watch the interview here. 

Interview with Denis Hurley in The Echo

I did an interview with Denis Hurley for The Echo about The First Sunday in September being the Croke Park GAA Museum’s Book Club Choice for October 2021. You can read it here. 

Older Events and News

Some older events from 2016 to 2018 November 2018: Reading of First Sunday in September, Ballincollig Library October 2018: Reading at Bandon Books. September 2018: Reading at Mallow Library for Cork Culture Night September 2018: Reading in UCC with Carys Davis and Danielle McLaughlin for Cork Culture Night. August 2018: Featured Writer at Fiction at the Friary. August 2018: Interviewed by RTE Radio 1 Book on One. August 2018: Launch of The First Sunday in September, at Triskel Arts Centre August 2018: Interviews with various newspapers and radio stations. March 2018: Reading at launch of Quarryman 2018, in UCC. September 2017: reading at Cork International Short Story Festival July 2016: reading of hows tommy boy was selected at the 2016 West Cork Literary Festival. July 2016: reading at The Killorglin Arts Festival (K-Fest) March 2016: reading at launch of Quarryman 2016 in UCC.  

2018 Interviews and Articles about The First Sunday in September

This is my last post of 2018 and it’s been some year. My first book The First Sunday in September was published in August by The Mercier Press. I’ve been busy, finishing the editing process for the book and reading and writing as much as I could. Thanks to everyone who supported me, I’m so grateful. Thanks to everyone who read my blog over the year and special thanks to those who took the time to follow, like and comment on the posts. Not to mention those who bought my book and read it. Some who read it were even good enough to contact me with kind words. You have no idea how much that means. Onward and upwards to 2019. I’ve a draft of a crime novel on the go and I’m now working on a book of essays on sport. The next few months will see a lot

Publicity for The First Sunday in September

A chairde, welcome to the August 24th, 2018 meeting of the Committee. The Rúnaí can’t be here tonight, he’s asked me to deputise on his behalf. First item on the agenda. The PRO wants to pass on the following information, though the chair:   Tadhg Coakley’s novel in stories, The First Sunday in September, was shortlisted for the Mercier Press Fiction Prize, 2017 and was published by Mercier Press in August 2018. It tells the story of a fictional All-Ireland Hurling Final Sunday, from the points of view of several recurring characters, exploring recurring themes.

Fógra: A Message from the PRO

A chairde, the PRO has asked me to pass on the following information, though the chair:   Tadhg Coakley’s novel in stories, The First Sunday in September, was shortlisted for the Mercier Press Fiction Prize, 2017 and was published by Mercier Press in August 2018. It tells the story of a fictional All-Ireland Hurling Final Sunday, from the points of view of several recurring characters, exploring recurring themes. From the book blurb: ‘It’s the day of the All-Ireland Hurling Final. A hungover Clareman goes to Dublin, having remortgaged his house and bet the last of the money on his county to win. An Englishwoman attends the final with her partner, wondering when to tell him that she’s pregnant. A long-retired player watches the match from the stands, his gaze repeatedly falling on the Cork captain, whom he and his wife gave up for adoption years earlier. Clare’s star forward struggles under

To Win Just Once – The Game Is On

So, anyway, I wrote this book. I got down off the ditch and into the game. Great view from the ditch, you can hold forth in high judgement and you can hide there, in the crowd. Not easy being inside the white lines, against tough opposition, making a show of yourself with everybody looking at you. Nowhere to hide. But I did it, anyway.